Life By Kristen

Go, and embrace your liberty. And see what wonderful things come of it. – Little Women

Summer 2018 Bucket List

Happy Summer Solstice!

 

  • Yoga on the Lawn at the outdoor market in my town ( and a visit to the outdoor market)
  • Farmer’s market on Wednesday afternoons near my work
  • Movie outside in Providence
  • Drinks by the water
  • Beach at least once in July and August
  • Berry picking
  • Lobster rolls, sweet corn
  • Lazy Sunday mostly filled with reading on my sun porch or backyard
  • Watch sunset
  • Music at local vineyard

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Little Women 150 Years Later

It’s hard to believe Little Women was written 150 years ago, and even harder to believe that so many of the issues that Louisa May Alcott wrote about are still things society is grappling with today. This AP article touches on some of these ideas, especially the idea of feminism and possible how Alcott would take the modern-day #MeToo movement.

I don’t remember the first time I read Little Women but it was definitely well before the 1994 film with Winona Ryder and Susan Sarandon (among others) came out. It’s a book that’s resonated me throughout my life at different times and one of the few books I’ve re-read. In fact, I re-read the book in 2011 shortly after deciding to end my marriage, which is also the time I began blogging. The quote on my blog masthead from the book found me at the perfect moment in my life when I was trying to figure out what I wanted for my life and it’s something that has stuck with me ever since.

I think some of my affinity for Little Women is the independent spirit of Jo March, a quality I value and a characteristic I think applies to me in many part of my life. I also feel a bit of a fierce local pride for the Alcott family and other writers from Concord, MA. I was born at the hospital in Concord and we visited the town several times when I was growing up, taking day trips to canoe on the Concord River, visit historical sites related to the American Revolution, and walked around Concord’s adorable downtown. I’ve been to Orchard House, the Alcott family home, a few times, though it’s been many years since I’ve visited so I think a summer day trip is in order. I’m sure my perspective will change now that I work in the history field, but it will always hold a special place in my heart.

I still pick up my copy of Little Women to read from time to time, though I’m well overdue for a complete re-read of the book. While Jo will likely always remain my favorite character, I have come to have a new appreciation for the older sister Meg and feel more emotional over the death of Beth than I did as a young person reading the book. The 1994 film is still my favorite and I always watch during the holiday season, though it isn’t your typical Christmas film. The 1933 Katharine Hepburn version is quite good as well– and filmed at Orchard House. I’m ashamed to say I still haven’t watched the most recent PBS Masterpiece adaptation, but that will be remedied very soon!

 

A few of the actresses who have played Jo March

 

Be Kind

The deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain last week came at a time when suicide was on the mind of Q and I already. A year ago, Q’s brother-in-law took his own life, and it’s changed so much of our family since then. Not just the actual physical loss of someone, but dealing with the pain of knowing they chose to leave this world and trying to make sense of it all. It’s been really hard for Q because he was incredibly close to his BIL, who often was the only person he’d talk to about some tough things. They were fishing buddies, and it’s something they did together, so much that Q hasn’t even fished since.

The saying that’s been going around all week “everyone’s fighting a battle, you don’t know it, so be kind,” is very true. This December marks 5 years since my Dad died, and I’ve felt his loss more this year than probably the previous few. I think part of it is because I’m in a transition- planning about moving somewhere new (who knows where!), possibly a new career, and hoping to expand my family with Q. I think a lot about Dad when I’m doing yard work or things around the house, something we often did together. Father’s Day is always a tricky time that brings up a lot of sadness because he isn’t here to celebrate and there is so much all around reminding me he is not here. I actually had to stop buying Q a Father’s Day card because I was having crying fits in the card aisle. This year feels particularly touchy because Q likely won’t see Little Man. It’s a long story, but we haven’t seen Q’s son in quite some time and I honestly don’t know when we will again. It’s another layer to our grief battle, just another kind.

All of this is to say to remember to be kind to people and to tell your people you love them.

Via LifeofTheKind

 

 

My Do Not Buy List

Do you have a “do not buy list?” Long before the no-spend challenge or other budget/financial goal challenges, I had a list of things I don’t like to or won’t spend money on. Here’s a bit of info on the idea , but it’s a pretty simple concept: these items you don’t buy either new, or at all. Here’s a few from my list and why:

  • New books: I can’t remember the last time I bought a book for my personal library brand-new. I also pretty infrequently buy used books. I choose the library for most of my physical book reads and only read free or Prime Reading books on my Kindle. I think the last time I bought a brand-new book was a few years ago when one of my beloved college professors published a novel.
  • Fast fashion: I don’t shop at places like H&M, Forever 21, or other spots that turn out cheap clothing at low prices. This has become remarkably easy for me as I’ve gotten older since a lot of fast fashion stores are aimed at a much younger, hipper demographic than mine!
  • Knickknacks and random house decor: I like minimal design for two reasons: my house is small and the less random stuff means less dusting/cleaning/arranging.
  • Random office supplies especially pens and notebooks/journals
  • Fancy makeup/face supplies

What’s on your no-buy list?

No Spend June

I’ve done a no-spend challenge before and was successful. I’m giving it a shot again this June.

When I did my first no- spend challenge in February of 2013, it was a way to finally get rid of credit card debt and eliminate a lot of my random shopping habits that had become one of my ways to fight boredom. I repeated in July of that year to try to get on top of frivolous spending. This time around, I have two objectives- one to save some dough to start putting towards my student loan pay down, and two, to stop shopping for clothes.

I have a love/hate relationship with my closet which is also directly related with how I feel about my body on any given day (but that’s for another day!). There are work clothes for everyday, work clothes for when I’m feeling blah and not great about how I look, and work clothes for important days/work cocktail parties/special events. I have weekend clothes for hanging around, for doing house or yardwork, and for going out to run errands or out to dinner. There are clothes that I’d never leave the house in and only wear for cooking, and so on. That’s not even saying anything about the fact that I live in a four-season climate that can have radically different temperatures from day to day, so often times the light wool sweaters are vying for the same space as the summer sundresses.

The result of this is I buy a lot of clothes. In the past, I’ve gone a couple of months in a row without buying clothes for myself, but then the seasons change and I realize I have no tank tops or sweaters, or some other category of clothing that I think I need. Newsflash: I almost never need anything. With the exception of maybe when I graduate from college and realized I had no professional work clothes, I’ve never been without something appropriate to wear.

In the past few years, the manner of my clothes shopping has changed dramatically, in that I mostly shop online now. I like having the ease of finding my size and the color I want without much effort, with the only use of my energy often coming if/when I return something that doesn’t fit. It’s a really bad habit and if you ask Q what one of his pet peeves is about me, it’d be this (mindless online shopping and always returning). In my mind, I don’t spend a lot of time shopping because I almost never go into an actual store to try on clothes or buy something frivolous.

But that’s not true because I changed where/how I shop! I’ve taken to a lot online consignment and secondhand options. ThredUp is the best and worst discovery I’ve made on the internet.  It gives me all the satisfaction of “the hunt” without having to spend hours in a secondhand store trying to find things I need. eBay is the same thing, especially since I can find the most random things on there like funky and different vintage brooches for under $5.

So this June, there will be no clothes shopping or late-night eBay brooch hunting. I won’t fill the time when Q is watching a bad sci-fi movie with hunting down dresses on consignment sites. I don’t need a single thing in my closet and in fact, I should spend more time concentrating on what I actually do wear and like, instead of having all these different ‘categories’ of clothes that are only for certain things– my life isn’t that busy, exciting, or diverse to have more than 1 special occasion dress!

The only allowed purchases in June are for the house projects on the list, approved health/beauty products (shampoo, conditioner, body wash, etc.), and groceries/house supplies like paper towels, TP, etc. I will resist the lure of the $5 sale t-shirts at Target and have already unsubscribed from all my favorite retailer emails. I’m hoping to pop an extra hundred dollars this month towards my student loan payment, with the aim on making this more of the norm for my monthly budget going forward!

 

 

 

Friday Finds May 2018

In 1938 Los Angeles, a woman went to jail for wearing pants in a courtroom. Amazing the things we take for granted today that were considered taboo or radical not that long ago.

Why cashmere can cost $2000 or $30– interesting.

This is terrifying- what happens to plastic that’s thrown away and not recycled.

The curious history of mother/daughter matching fashion. My mom and I never did the 80s thing of wearing the same dress, but we frequently wear the same color schemes. We even bought the same exact pair of sneakers independently of each other!

The changing history and silhouette of high school prom dresses since the 1940s.

The Chinese survivors of the Titanic. I definitely never heard about this!

5 on Friday: Podcasts

It’s been awhile since I shared some of the podcasts I’m listening to these days. My podcast subscriptions was once up to something like 25 (though all not in active seasons at one time), so I recently pared down quite a bit. Here are 5 new-ish finds to me that I really enjoy.

 

Annotated 

 

This podcast from Book Riot is now in its second season and I’m enjoying it as much as the first. The stories are all related to books, language, and reading but is not book recommedations or just talking about authors or titles. Favorite episode of Season 1 was about the oxford comma.

Making Obama

This comes from the same folks who did the Making Oprah podcast, which I HIGHLY recommend if you have ever wondered how Oprah became a household name and bizillionaire. These episodes are about Obama’s rise in the political world starting with his community organizing days in Chicago. While I read Obama’s memoir Dreams of My Father, I didn’t know much about the political climate he was in prior to hitting the national stage as a senator. Not too much political junk, and lots of back story I didn’t know.

Planet Money

Being an NPR geek, I subscribe to a lot of NPR supported/hosted podcasts. I often heard ads promoting this one on some of my other must-listens, and was never super intrigued. What made me change? There was a promo spot on Pop Culture Happy Hour for an episode about China and money that sounded interesting, and since I knew Q and I were going to be in the car a lot for our Utah vacation, I downloaded it since I thought he’d be interested in it too. And I was right! That one episode made me download a bunch of others and subscribe. I like that it explains complex current affairs related to economy and trade in normal, non-jargon ways, as well as puts them in context with real-life people, events, and issues instead of just a bunch of talking heads/experts who make my head hurt.

Retropod

I know many people who say they can’t get into podcasts because they don’t have a place to fit them into their lives because they don’t commute or have dedicated time to listen. The episodes of Retropod are only about 3-4 minutes long, making them ideal for quick snippets of history and facts that are often related to current events, holidays, or other cultural milestones. I especially like it for the days when a podcast doesn’t entirely fill my commute and I can listen to a few of them in the last 10 minutes or so of my drive.

Sidedoor

I can’t remember quite how I happened across this podcast from the Smithsonian ( probably facebook), but it’s quickly become a favorite. It covers a wide variety of topics from the Smithsonian’s collections and interviews with experts, but in a totally fun and dynamic way that hasn’t been boring yet. The episode about the artist and process for the National Portrait Gallery’s commission of First Lady Michelle Obama’s portrait was a favorite.

2018 Goal: Digitize Family Photos

If you’ve been reading my blog for any period of time, it’s not surprise that family is the most important thing in my life. I spend a lot of time with them, talk to them on the phone/text multiple times a day, and so on. In my house, I’m surrounded my family heirlooms, mementos, and photos that are my most valued possessions. After my mother and grandmother sold their houses, I became the keeper of some of the family photographs, in particular my Dad’s collection of slides from the 1970s and 1980s when that was a thing you did when developing film.

One of the my goals of 2018 is to pare back the amount of stuff we have, partly because Q and I are hoping to move in the next year or so, and partly because I want to be able to use and engage with the stuff I have. I really wanted to digitize my Dad’s slides because so many of them were from when he was in art school and I wanted to make some prints of his photos to hang alongside those of my aunt’s (his sister), who is a very talented photographer. Also, there were a lot of baby photos in these slides of me, and as the second child, there was a serious lack of photos hanging around with me as a baby because my parents were sleepless and frazzled with jobs and 2 kids under the age of 2!

A few years back, photographer aunt found an online company, Scan Cafe, to digitize her batch of family photos and I used them to digitize my parent’s 8mm film collection onto a DVD for a Christmas present. I was impressed with their pricing and service, so went through them again to do this latest batch of digitization. I’ll go back to them again for my next batch and then hope to attack the photo albums and such that my mother has after that.

As a museum person and historian, I know the photos and slides will only fade over time, so this was a big priority for me to tackle this year, especially a lot of the early photos of my grandparents from the 1950s. It was a great winter project to spend a weekend organizing and going through photos, even if it made me miss my Dad and Grandpa a ton. Scan Cafe has a lot of different packages and has deals all the time so it wasn’t an expensive venture, but preserving memories is priceless (Sorry that sounds like a really cheese tag line!)

Me, Christmas 1983. Photo by Dad.

 

All opinions my own. This is an honest review of Scan Cafe based on my experiences. I paid for all services on my own and was not provided anything or solicited by Scan Cafe for this review. 

Travel Tuesday: Utah

Utah isn’t probably a place high on many people’s travel to-do lists, but it should be! It’s one of the most interesting places, both with its Mormon culture and its amazing geography and natural wonders. My aunt lived there over 20 years ago and now has made it her home again. Q had never been to to the state, and it had been so many years since I was last there, that we were both anxious to visit. We also both desperately needed a vacation!

We were in Utah for a week and packed it full of time with family and exploring. We spent a few days down in Moab to visit Dead Horse Point State Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Arches National Park. The weather was absolute perfection. I kept saying to Q as we were driving around that nothing was familiar to me, but seeing as the last time I was there I was about 14, my perspective of everything was from the backseat of the car. I also realized that we always visited in July ( with one Christmas visit one year) when it was blazing hot so I likely opted to stay in the air conditioned car instead of hiking around.

 Arches National Park

2 relaxed, happy vacationers (minus Q’s sunburned arm)

at Canyonlands National Park.

This photo is the best because my aunt took it. 

Q had only two goals with this vacation- to consume as much Jamba Juice and In & Out Burger as possible. He had Jamba Juice every day ( a few days twice!) and we did In & Out 3 times. He was  a happy camper.

This is Jamba Juice visit #1

We encountered some closed shops and roads in the mountain areas where there is still snow and threats of avalanche. Park City is busiest in the winter and then picks up again in the summer, so there were several shops and museums closed for “spring break cleaning” since it was the last week of April. It didn’t dampen our spirits though- it was lovely to be out and walking around in the sun.

Two highlights of the trip ( other than spending much needed time with family): Hole in the Rock in Moab and Gilgal Gardens in Salt Lake City. The first is a totally wacky roadside stop and essentially historic home that is built into the giant rock. You cannot take photos inside, but it was quirky and weird in a way that I love– it had everything from amateur taxidermy that was truly creepy to fascinating stories about the couple who used dynamite to carve out their home and diner in the base of this rock. Gilgal is a hidden sculpture garden in a residential neighborhood of SLC that was quiet and quirky.

The view from my aunt’s porch 

 

Gilgal Garden

Great Salt Lake

Merry May

I’m back from vacation feeling refreshed and looking forward to the month of May!

It’s finally warmed up in my neck of the woods– it was a dreary and cold April. When we left for our Utah vacation on the 20th, we actually had the heat on that morning, which is just absurd for that late in April. When we came home, the grass was green and our lilac bush has buds on it!

I’ve got a post just about our vacation on tap in the next few weeks, but it was wonderful to get away, spend time with my aunt, grandma, and other family, and lots of exploring with Q. The warmth and sunshine of Utah was just what we needed.

My return to work was also quite interesting yesterday as some big changes are happening. While it’s still  unclear what it means for my role, I’m hopeful that positive adjustments in my daily activities and responsibilities are coming. I’m also optimistic that the changes will mean a little less emotional and mental stress from my day job that may finally give me the creative space I need in my current role so that I can start and end my days with my own personal creative writing.

My main goal for this month is to knock some nagging items off my to-do list for the year- go through attic stuff, declutter closets, and start on the large list of house projects.

May is also a month for celebrations: birthdays for my brother, aunt, sister-in-law, and Q turns 40! Mother’s Day and Memorial Day, plus all the excitement of the coming summer season have me feeling very good about the next 29 days.

 

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