Life By Kristen

Go, and embrace your liberty. And see what wonderful things come of it. – Little Women

Archive for the category “Friday Finds”

Friday Finds May 2018

In 1938 Los Angeles, a woman went to jail for wearing pants in a courtroom. Amazing the things we take for granted today that were considered taboo or radical not that long ago.

Why cashmere can cost $2000 or $30– interesting.

This is terrifying- what happens to plastic that’s thrown away and not recycled.

The curious history of mother/daughter matching fashion. My mom and I never did the 80s thing of wearing the same dress, but we frequently wear the same color schemes. We even bought the same exact pair of sneakers independently of each other!

The changing history and silhouette of high school prom dresses since the 1940s.

The Chinese survivors of the Titanic. I definitely never heard about this!

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Friday Finds April 2018

Betty Reid Soskin is 96 years old and works at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II National Park that memorializes the experiences of women workers during World War 2. In this article, she speaks about how Rosie the Riveter didn’t speak to all women’s experiences in WW2. LOVE this quote: “What gets remembered is determined by who is in the room doing the remembering.”

How Girl Scout cookies are made.

Women in Hollywood’s past who were leaders– many names I’ve never heard before.

Saving the history of cosmetics, beauty products, and fragrances at the Smithsonian.

The afterlife of movie wardrobes after production is done.

Funny movie quotes from the past 40 years that have become part of our everyday conversations/language.

What a compassionate, open-minded judge: teens who graffitied a historic building with racist symbols and words were ordered to read a book related to racism, Holocaust, etc.

Friday Finds March 2017

Dolly Parton’s charity that provides free books to kids gave out is 100 millionth free book! Amazing.

Another phenomenal female- a 101 year old female runner in India.

In honor of Women’s History Month, the NY Times is writing obituaries for women who were overlooked. This particular link takes you to Ruth Wakefield, who invented the chocolate chip cookie recipe we all love so much. Here’s the link for the whole series, Overlooked.

Did you know a woman invented the paper bag? Me either.

How certain foods became associated with certain meal times in America. Related: I hate cereal.

The odd and weird platypus.

Geek alert- plastics and museums. I spend a lot of time thinking about how 20th century materials break down in the museum collection I manage (especially plastics, polyester, and vinyl!) so this is interesting to me.

Friday Finds February 2018

Library borrowing records of millions of New Yorkers are made public, including Alexander Hamilton, Roald Dahl, and more. Very cool!

I’ve been watching a lot of the Olympics this month. I’m not sure what it is about the Games that makes me spend a couple of hours on a Saturday watching luge or downhill skiing when I wouldn’t do that on any other random Saturday. In any case, a few Olympic-related articles: how to manage stress like an Olympic athlete  and and Olympic figure skater who was also the first female sportswriter at the NY Times.

Do you watch The Good Place on NBC? It’s one of my favorite shows and the only current sitcom and network TV show we watch. We binged-watched it over the summer after its first season was done, as I kept reading/hearing recs from friends, podcasts, etc. about it. The second season was just as good as the first. This article is not just about the show’s concept ( which is dealing with the idea of afterlife in a funny way), but how it talks about this big, weighty issue in a comedic way. Personally, my version of heaven has all my loved ones who have gone before me, and lots of bread and cheese.

In 3rd grade, when we were assigned to do biographical sketches of a historic person, I chose Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female doctor in the United States. Here’s a bit more of her story– happy to see more people will know about her and her achievements now that a media with a wider audience has done this piece on her.

This article on Mr. Rogers is from years ago, but on the occasion of the show’s 50th anniversary, it’s been reprinted. Still so true today that he is a hero to kids, especially Mr. Rogers’ phrase to children who are scared in times of crisis “look for the helpers.” Also, the StoryCorps podcast had a wonderful episode with the actor who played Officer Clemons that made my week. You can find more on that episode here.

 

Friday Finds January 2018

I will always be a paper planner gal as I completely believe there is a hand writing to brain connection. This article totally is behind paper planners, and I love their approach to finding the perfect one.

While I don’t think I suffer from Seasonal Affectiveness Disorder (SAD), there are definitely blah days that happen in the winter time more than other times of year. There are some great tips in this article about how to manage SAD. I’m really intrigued by the dawn stimulator light for the days when I don’t see the sunlight until I’m well into my work commute.

Two really interesting resources highlighting some lesser known women in our cultural history: Female pioneers in architecture and American women cartoonists and illustrators.

I might work in museums, but I still don’t understand historical reenactors.

Something I’m working on for myself- why we need ‘white space’ in our daily routines.

Friday Finds December 2017

As a long time lover of purple, I’m very excited for Pantone’s 2018 color of the year- ultraviolet!

I don’t think you can make a great grilled cheese without it, but what the heck is really in American cheese?

In praise of Anne of Green Gables  (and girls who ask too many questions, of which I am proudly in that category). I recently listened to the book on my commute and was reminded all over again why I love it.

I love all things related to the Muppets, including Emmett Otter’s Jug Band Christmas, which turns 40 this year!

My mother’s side has lots of Dutch farmers and many of the older generation still wore wooden clogs to do work on their farms, so this article about 19th century Dutch farmers ruining their feet from clogs was intriguing!

Our family gave up giving gifts to each other about 3 years ago and it was the best decision we ever made. I enjoyed reading this author’s perspective on no-gift Christmas too and this one on the joy of a simple Christmas.

Dressing fashionably while protesting.

 

 

Friday Finds November 2017

Pretty light on the links today as it’s been a busy month with not a lot of internet diving!

I hope you had a lovely Thanksgiving yesterday and are enjoying a lovely lazy day at home or a productive day out shopping getting good deals!

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Have you ever used a Himalayan salt lamp? I keep hearing about the health benefits of this, as well as the ‘salt caves’ that seem to be popping up all over in my neck of the woods. I am curious, especially if it can help with allergies and sinus stuff.

The FBI is reopening the mystery of who alerted the Nazis to Anne Frank’s family in hiding. This includes searching through historical archives, so a great example of history and criminal justice coming together.

Speaking of WW2, a fascinating and important new project out of Northeastern University is documenting the stories of female scientists and scholars.

Quilts made by British soldiers from military uniforms in the 19th century– very cool.

Yet another thing to worry about and plan for- your digital legacy.

 

Friday Finds October 2017

If I find a dress with pockets, I feel like I’ve hit the lottery. Here’s a short history of pockets and women’s clothing, and why it’s uncommon to find dresses with them.

There are some museum jobs that get to do the coolest things like cleaning and prepping a spaceship to travel around the country.

As with many gals in my age bracket, I love the movie Dirty Dancing. I had no idea there was an annual festival dedicated to the movie, so I may have to add this to my bucket list.

How setting constraints allowed Dr. Seuss to create his greatest work.

Have you ever wondered where priests get their vestments and other ceremonial clothing? Me either, but this article was interesting and was something I never even thought about previously.

The history of playgrounds in the United States.

Friday Finds September 2017

I like to think I’m an organized person who doesn’t have a lot of unnecessary clutter, so I often get a bit anxious when I look in closets, the attic, or the basement and see stuff that doesn’t get used every day. It’s definitely my personality quirk and something I oddly enjoy, so I find myself randomly decluttering a lot, often without any rhyme or reason, so I like this list of questions to keep in mind when going through the closets and piles of stuff.

Something I never thought about in regards to hurricanes- what do zoos and aquariums do? I love that image of the flamingos in the bathroom.

I love seltzer. This is a new thing within the past year or so for me, and drinking it instead of sugary juices or bottled ice teas is part of my weight loss success. This piece is a bit long and not just about seltzer drinkers, but I found it interesting, especially since I’m a New England Polar Seltzer lover ( Cranberry Lime forever).

Speaking of New England foods, chances are if you grew up there, you had a Fluffernutter Sandwich. I actually hated them, but it was a staple of my brother’s diet for many years. Side note- Fluff is amazing in Rice Krispie treats and can take fudge to next level amazing because of the crazy amount of sugar in it.

Ever since leaving grad school, I have been calling myself a “lifelong learner.” Apparently, it’s healthy and good all around to be curious and love to learn. Related: how to cultivate curiosity.

I love ballet and cannot wait to finally get to see The Nutcracker as an adult this coming December. I heard this on NPR last week and loved hearing more about the shop that makes the New York City Ballet tutus (among other costumes).

As a lover of libraries and archives, this article about the NYC Public Library archives system and archivists was delightful.

Friday Finds August 2017

This is my type of camping.

Money can buy happiness in form of a housekeeper and takeout. Amen to that, especially the takeout! I always say, my sanity has a price.

Parting with collectibles. Also- the stuff you have is never really worth what you think it will be because in the end, it’s just stuff and there’s almost always someone else who has the same (or better!) stuff than you.

As a side note, a few months ago I did an informal Facebook poll of friends and colleagues who also worked in museums/libraries. I found for the most part that there weren’t a ton of “collectors” in the group that were in the younger age bracket. Maybe it’s because we work with stuff everyday that means we don’t have any in our home lives. A few people did have collections, but were very picky about what they brought into their home.

 

 

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