Life By Kristen

Go, and embrace your liberty. And see what wonderful things come of it. – Little Women

Little Women 150 Years Later

It’s hard to believe Little Women was written 150 years ago, and even harder to believe that so many of the issues that Louisa May Alcott wrote about are still things society is grappling with today. This AP article touches on some of these ideas, especially the idea of feminism and possible how Alcott would take the modern-day #MeToo movement.

I don’t remember the first time I read Little Women but it was definitely well before the 1994 film with Winona Ryder and Susan Sarandon (among others) came out. It’s a book that’s resonated me throughout my life at different times and one of the few books I’ve re-read. In fact, I re-read the book in 2011 shortly after deciding to end my marriage, which is also the time I began blogging. The quote on my blog masthead from the book found me at the perfect moment in my life when I was trying to figure out what I wanted for my life and it’s something that has stuck with me ever since.

I think some of my affinity for Little Women is the independent spirit of Jo March, a quality I value and a characteristic I think applies to me in many part of my life. I also feel a bit of a fierce local pride for the Alcott family and other writers from Concord, MA. I was born at the hospital in Concord and we visited the town several times when I was growing up, taking day trips to canoe on the Concord River, visit historical sites related to the American Revolution, and walked around Concord’s adorable downtown. I’ve been to Orchard House, the Alcott family home, a few times, though it’s been many years since I’ve visited so I think a summer day trip is in order. I’m sure my perspective will change now that I work in the history field, but it will always hold a special place in my heart.

I still pick up my copy of Little Women to read from time to time, though I’m well overdue for a complete re-read of the book. While Jo will likely always remain my favorite character, I have come to have a new appreciation for the older sister Meg and feel more emotional over the death of Beth than I did as a young person reading the book. The 1994 film is still my favorite and I always watch during the holiday season, though it isn’t your typical Christmas film. The 1933 Katharine Hepburn version is quite good as well– and filmed at Orchard House. I’m ashamed to say I still haven’t watched the most recent PBS Masterpiece adaptation, but that will be remedied very soon!

 

A few of the actresses who have played Jo March

 

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One thought on “Little Women 150 Years Later

  1. 1994 is my favorite too 🙂

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